Monthly Archives: April 2015

Sees, Seas, Seize The Day!

Thanks to Jayne, a member of the Camden Writers Group, this wonderful admonishment has been resurrected from the deep recesses of my mind.

Last week’s critique group meeting was spent reviewing several submissions, one of which was entitled, Seas the Day.  An experimental piece, Jayne stretched her writers’ wings, exploring the use of ‘flashback’ in the telling of a recent event in her life.

What’s fun to note is her punny use of the phrase Seize the Day.  I learned that it’s a beach-y quote, commonly quipped among those of the Carolina Coastal Community.  Never heard it before, but I’m always up for a good entendre, double or not.

Jayne is always blogging about her writers group and how much she loves us all.  Or in her words, “That is to say, I love learning and growing, and the members of the group continue to help me do just that.”

I’m with ya, Jayne. Continue reading

In Search of a Replacement Classical Guitar Case

In 1994 I purchased my first custom handmade classical guitar.  A Thomas Prisloe.  Crafted with an Englemann Spruce top, Indian Rosewood sides and back and customized features, it came housed in a Pro Tec International case.

My 1994 Prisloe nestled in its original Pro Tec International case, 2015

My 1994 Prisloe nestled in its original Pro Tec International case, 2015

Both have served me well these past 21 years of gigging, performing, recording, teaching and traveling.

The woods of this guitar have long since opened up, developing a tone quality shaped by the touch of my fingers and style of playing.  The case remains a stalwart protector of its charge.

Heavily padded, yet extremely lightweight and durable, this case kept the Prisloe at a consistent temperature and humidity level as well as safe and secure during transport.  It didn’t show signs of falling apart until we ended our between homes journey in July 2012. Continue reading

A Suitcase Full of Chocolate

Quote symbolA SUITCASE FULL OF CHOCOLATE is the film about the life of SOFIA COSMA (1914-2011), a devoted mother, a modest woman of great personal character, a great pianist, and the ultimate survivor. Born at the outbreak of World War I, this remarkable musician began a brilliant career as a prize winner in the Viennese International Piano Competition of 1933. Hitler’s invasion of Austria, and Sofia’s subsequent long imprisonment in a Soviet Labor camp, forced her to abandon her music for many years. This is the remarkable story of her ultimate triumph as a mother, a concert artist in the Communist world, then an American citizen with a new life, and a free woman, who returned to Russia to solo with the Moscow Philharmonic. The life of Sofia Cosma is a lesson about Freedom, that precious commodity which most of us take for granted. It is also a lesson about artistry, not fame. Through unbelievable adversity, this musician made music at the highest level, cared for her family, kept her sense of humor, and remained genuinely modest throughout her life.” Lincoln Mayorga

I don’t remember how I came across this intriguingly titled video trailer, but if not for the name, I know I’d have missed it altogether.  I’m glad the chocolate drew me in…Once drawn in, I still haven’t a clue as to what the chocolate connection actually is, but, that’s part of the continuity of the draw for when the video becomes more widely available to a larger audience.  I suspect it has something to do with Sofia’s eventual escape from the Communist world, but that is of course simply my own speculation.

“In an age when we make heroes out of musicians who struggle with drugs, it is rare to encounter one whose life is profoundly inspiring.”  ~ Lincoln Mayorga